Hot News from the Bolivian Consulate. Well, Sort Of.

Hot news from the Bolivian Consulate. Well, sort of.

That’s an attention grabbing way to turn off 99% of my Blog audience I’m guessing.

Certainly most of my clientele with business in South America are dealing with Brazil or Argentina, and Bolivian requirements and practice are perhaps a somewhat niche interest in Leeds.

But of course, all the more useful, if you do have interests there, to know that there is the necessary expertise here in Leeds, at AtkinsonNotary. [As, if I may say so, there is regarding all the Countries of the World]

As to the actual hot news, to begin with, you must proceed as before. Your document – contract, deed, assignment of copyright, etc., will require stamping as previously. First with the Notarial seal, in respect of my certification that you have signed in my presence. Secondly with the British Foreign and Commonwealth Apostille stamps, whereby the British Government certify and warrant that I am a properly qualified and insured Notary Public in England. And thirdly, with the stamp of the Bolivian Consulate.

I am at a loss for an actual reason for step three, mind, but step three is nevertheless essential.

And my news relates to step three.

Because now, in order to get step three achieved, your document must be translated into Spanish. And that translation Notarised. And Legalised. And submitted for Consular stamp.

So, after the English language document is signed and notarised, the translator must make a translation into Spanish, then appear before a Notary, to make a formal declaration that they have the necessary expertise to perform translation, and that document A [the Translator’s document written in Spanish] is a true translation into the Spanish Language of document B [the attached copy of your document.]

And then, that translator’s notarised certificate must also be endorsed with the Apostille stamp of the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and the Bolivian Consular stamp also.

Clearly the fees involved in dealing with the translation into Spanish will likely exceed the fees for the notarisation and stamping of the original substantive document.

What to do?

First, contact me, we can arrange for the necessary translations at relative short notice, or perhaps better still, do not write your original documents in English!

The Bolivians will only insist upon the translation into Spanish, in respect of non-Spanish texts.

So if you arrange to have the terms of your Bolivian documents, once agreed, translated into Spanish before you sign them, then the documents you are submitting to the Consulate are in Spanish. And no translation palaver is required.

I think this is an example of how it can save money, if individuals and companies bear in mind the Notarisation formalities and requirements of each Country in which you are doing business, as integral to the process of document preparation.

If you – as most do – go down the route of preparing the documentation in English text for signing and witnessing by a “deadline day”, and then looking around to see what legalisation process is needed thereafter, you are pretty much guaranteeing wasted time and money.

Come see us first. And that goes for anywhere, not just Bolivia!

And, as always, you can contact me or Louise here at AtkinsonNotary E7 Joseph’s Well Leeds LS3 1AB, phone 0113 8160116 and email notary@atkinsonnotary.com or via the website http://www.atkinsonnotary.com

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