Notarisation. Never a Dull Moment. No, Really.

Notarisation. Never a Dull Moment. No, Really.

No doubt there are those who imagine that the world and work of a Notary tends ever so slightly towards the enervative side of the tedium spectrum.

But I am here to tell you NO. Just like the wacky purviews of the Accountants and the Actuaries, a Notary’s work-load is an exciting daily roller-coaster ride of new and often baffling conundrums.

For this week, a reminder for this Notary that doing it the job “correctly” is no substitute for doing the job in a way in which it will be acceptable to the end user abroad. And that there is a difference between being knowledgeable, and being wise. Wise is better!

An example is that of the colour of ink to be used. As we are taught at Notary Nursery school, three countries in the world will reject out of hand the use of any colour or form of ink other than black fountain pen. [South Africa, Italy and Malaysia].

Since there is only one place which requires the use of Blue ink [Florida USA], it is easy enough therefore to use black ink for everything, with a blue pen on stand-by for Floridian documents.

So imagine the frisson of excitement and ruffled feathers in the Notarial World, when a document for Hungary has been rejected there, for use of Black Ink. The same black ink that Notaries have been submitting to Hungary for hundreds of years. NO, says the Hungarian nut-job “I WANT BLUE INK”

The reality for Hungary is that the old Civil Code has a section – incidentally now repealed – that requires signatures to be “visibly original”. Well whatever that phrase means, it surely cannot mean that a blue signature is necessarily original or a black one not visibly original, in this day and age of colour photocopies.

There is NO Hungarian prohibition on the use of black ink.

Notarial documents bear an impressed seal in any event so that the original document is not flat as a photocopy is flat. [Are there 3D photocopiers yet?]

Notarial Documents for use in Hungary bear the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Apostille, verifiable on the internet.

Every other Hungarian lawyer accepts black ink documents. So there are lots of good points to raise in argument. If you want an argument.

The point is though, that doing things right gets you only so far. The reality is that if a man in Hungary wants a document to be signed in Blue Ink, it is quicker and cheaper to – you guessed – sign it in Blue Ink.

So a knowledgeable Notary in England might pass his exams and do everything by the book and send a black ink document to Hungary and get them rejected, whilst a wise Notary will before starting work, ask the man in Hungary – what colour ink would you like?

And by the way, I may have lied about the exciting Actuaries.

And blue and black ink pens are available here so, as always, whenever you have documents to Notarise to use abroad, you can contact me or Louise here at AtkinsonNotary E7 Joseph’s Well Leeds LS3 1AB, phone 0113 8160116 and email notary@atkinsonnotary.com or via the website http://www.atkinsonnotary.com